Parenting News You Can Use! March 16, 2010

Parenting News You Can Use!
March 16, 2010
Volume 4, Issue 11
Publisher: INCAF
E-Mail: docdebfry@earthlink.net
www.deborah-fry.com or www.incaf.com
A Certified Redirecting Children’s Behavior ™ Company

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Focus for February: Nutrition Month
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IN THIS ISSUE:
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1. Redirecting Children’s Behavior Spring 2010 Course Schedule (see Home page)
2. Raising Teens
3. Food, Inc.
4. Toxic Bath Toys
5. Good Old Fashioned Play
6. Take a Nap
7. Have Fun Learning to Read!
8. Ten Ways to Eat Green
9. Love Your Vulnerability!
10. Inspirational Quotes of the Week

2. Raising Teens
In Between Parent and Teenager, Dr. Haim Ginott promoted compassionate parenting. The book contains detailed conversations with teens – the type of conversations that keep the door to connection and communication open. Read more about Dr. Ginott’s suggestions and the experience of raising a teen. Leave your comments!
CLICK HERE for More

3. Food, Inc.
We’ve previously highlighted the film Food, Inc. in Parenting News. With its recent nomination for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, it deserves a second mention, especially during National Nutrition Month.
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4. Toxic Bath Toys
Please check this article about recent reports on toxic bath toys. Tests not only showed fecal matter, E. coli bacteria and staph, but also Phthalates. Safe alternatives are given.
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5. Good Old Fashioned Play
From playing four square and snail to skipping stones, here are fifteen ways to encourage old fashioned play without any electronic components. Instructions – not batteries – are included.
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6. Take a Nap
By Wes Hopper

One of the best ways to put your intuition and creativity to work is with a nap. We all get to the point when we’re wrestling with a problem where we are just out of ideas. That’s the best time for a nap.

Thomas Edison was famous for taking short naps and waking up with an answer. The chemist August Kekule was baffled by the complex structure of the benzene molecule, until he had a dream of a snake eating its own tail.

Why does sleep help? Physicist Amit Goswami believes that there’s a quantum aspect of mind that exists as infinite possibilities. When we relax, we allow the mind to choose new answers, connect in new ways, and this is where our creativity comes from. Meditation can boost creativity for the same reason – a relaxed mind.

So instead of agonizing over problems that seem unsolvable, turn them over to your imagination and intuition, your quantum mind. Relax. Take a nap. Meditate. Repeat as necessary. Be confident that there’s enough creativity in you to solve anything. Because there is! And that’s something to be grateful for!
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7. Have Fun Learning to Read!
The website Starfall opened in September of 2002 as a free public service to motivate children to read with phonics. The systematic phonics approach, in conjunction with phonemic awareness practice, is perfect for ages pre-school through second grade. Starfall is educational as well as entertaining.
CLICK HERE for More

8. Ten Ways to Eat Green
Here are ten important – yet simple and affordable – tips on how to eat green. From suggestions on healthier snacks to “banning the can”, these ten ideas are perfect to practice in your family beginning in March, National Nutrition Month.
CLICK HERE for More

9. Love Your Vulnerability!
Richard and Bonney Schaub write about becoming more vulnerable through the experience of loss.
CLICK HERE for More

10. Inspirational Quote of the Week
“It is a common experience that a problem difficult at night is resolved in the morning after the committee of sleep has worked on it.” … John Steinbeck