Parenting News You Can Use! August 14, 2012

Parenting News You Can Use!
August 14, 2012
Volume 6, Issue 34
Publisher: INCAF
E-Mail: docdebfry@earthlink.net
www.deborah-fry.com or www.incaf.com
A Certified Redirecting Children’s Behavior ™ Company

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IN THIS ISSUE:
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1. Redirecting Children’s Behavior Course Schedule for Fall 2012 (see home page)
2. Watching Television is Relaxing
3. Why Do You Have to Tell Them Five Times?
4. A Simple Weekly Rhythm with Kids
5. Be Inspired
6. How to Change Beliefs with Actions
7. Listen to Me!
8. Go Green on Campus
9. Three Simple Rules to Massively Improve Your Teen’s Writing Skills
10. Inspirational Quote of the Week

2. Watching Television is Relaxing
Teacher Tom writes in his latest blog post, “Watching television relaxes you. The almost undetectable screen flicker is a perfect mechanism for lowering our brain waves into the alpha state, the condition we’re going for when we meditate. This is why it’s so effective for calming an agitated or over-stimulated kid.” He then addresses how after more than a half hour of television exposure one falls into a stupor and even experiences a hang over after the television is shut off. His entire post is worth the read if only for the last line!
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3. Why Do You Have to Tell Them Five Times?
Elizabeth Kolbert wrote in her article for the New Yorker, Spoiled Rotten: Why do kids rule the roost? , “In one fairly typical encounter, a father asked his eight-year-old son five times to please go take a bath or a shower. After the fifth plea went unheeded, the father picked the boy up and carried him into the bathroom. A few minutes later, the kid, still unwashed, wandered into another room to play a video game.” In her series addressing Kolbert’s article, Dr. Laura Markham says, “This situation may be extreme, but most parents I know have some version of this complaint. It’s a good question: Why don’t kids just do what we say the first time we say it?! And there’s a good answer.” Dr. Markham supplies us with five!
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4. A Simple Weekly Rhythm with Kids
School is starting, and Kara Fleck of Simple Kids addresses the quickly filling schedule by saying, “This is the time of year when our calendars fill up as the children head back to school and the holiday season looms. If we aren’t careful, the days can get a little crazy. If you’re just getting started establishing a rhythm for your family, or perhaps if you are re-evaluating your days as you enter a new circumstance, my advice is to focus on what I call the anchors of your week: the times which center us, that we can count on.”
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5. Be Inspired
Leo Babauta of ZenHabits has seven lessons that inspire inspiration!
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6. How to Change Beliefs with Actions
By Wes Hopper

Dr Robert Anthony said, “The most significant discovery of the human potential movement is that you can change your beliefs through your actions as easily as you can change your actions through your beliefs.” We all know that we can change our actions by changing our beliefs. But that’s not much help with every issue because some of our beliefs are really strong and hard to change. There’s a part of us deep down that’s saying, “You can’t fool me. I know what you’re really like.” So what can we do? Well, one little game that often works is to play “as if.”

Suppose we want to be a writer, but we just feel like it’s a wild dream and we’re an imposter. So we say to ourselves, “OK, I know I’m not really a writer, but if I was, what would I be doing and thinking now?” Then we play the game of acting as if we were that writer. We decide that a writer would choose a subject, do an outline, and write a table of contents. So we do that. No big pressure, it’s just a game, right?

What would a writer do next? Then we do that. As we keep at it, we find that we start feeling like a writer, even as we continue to play the “as if” game. We change our beliefs by our actions and use the game to take the pressure to be perfect off of us. Because that’s the thought behind the resistance to new actions – the pressure to be perfect the first time we do it. Even though no one else has ever been perfect the first time at anything! Even Stephen King collected a large box of rejection slips when he started his writing career.

So what do you need to start? How can the “as if” game help you to get going? Get different results with different actions.
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7. Listen to Me!
Early childhood educator Jeanne Zoo writes, “One of my most powerful memories of Becoming the Teacher I Want To Be was when I first listened – really, really listened – to my 2-year-old friend Nathan. In the outside play yard one day, Nathan called to me…”Come, come…come help me look for the tigers in the big tree! Come, come. The tree tigers are calling to us and we need to find them in the tree! Come, come, come!” Be sure to read the story of Nathan and the Tigers. This is a great one for educators.
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8. Go Green on Campus
Do you have a college student in the family? Here are ways to go green on campus from the Nature Conservancy’s Everyday Environmentalist. Your kids at home can apply these as well.
CLICK HERE for More

9. Three Simple Rules to Massively Improve Your Teen’s Writing Skills
The ability to communicate through the written word is incredibly valuable. School is starting, and here are three simple rules from The Study Gurus to assist your teen in improving his or her writing skills.
CLICK HERE for More

10. Inspirational Quote of the Week
“One’s philosophy is not best expressed in words; it’s expressed in the choices one makes.” Eleanor Roosevelt
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